Iowa State University
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College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
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  • David Campbell


    David Campbell
    General Science
    1955
    Psychology
    1958

    "It has defined my whole career."

    A rainstorm that drove him into Curtiss Hall literally changed David Campbell's life. There he saw an announcement for a computer programming course, a class that came in handy during his Ph.D. studies at the University of Minnesota.

    "I was the only one in the program who knew about computer programming. I was hired to program 30 years of results of the Strong Interest Inventory." The original author died soon afterwards and "the inventory fell into my lap."

    Now know as the Strong-Campbell Interest Inventory, the assessment guides individuals toward career choices and has become one of the most widely use career surveys.

    Brent Curvey
    Brent Curvey
    Criminal Justice and Sociology
    Senior

    Football star tackles new role on ISU Theatre stage.

    Any Cyclone fan has heard of Brent Curvey. The senior is a two-team all-Big 12 defensive lineman who has set his sights on a professional career. But if things don't work out with football, Brent might set his sights on another high profile profession. Last spring Brent tackled a new role, this one as the male lead in ISU Theatre's production of "Intimate Apparel."

    "It was my goal to act on the collegiate level (he appeared in high school productions) just to see what the difference was."

    While he's enjoyed his time on stage, Brent is realistic about the future.

    "Right now it's my football career that is going to take me places. Acting is a one in a million shot. Still I put my all into the play and who knows? Maybe I'll take a stab at it someday and see what happens."

    Kathy Leonard
    Kathy Leonard
    Professor
    Spanish


    No safety equipment. No breathing apparatuses. No barricades.

    Unimaginable. That's how Kathy Leonard describes the working conditions of Boilivian miners. Among those miners as children as young as five years old and women. This academic year, Kathy is spending several months in Bolivia chronicling that nation's "women of silver and tin," who spend 10-12 hours a day sitting just outside the mine entrances breaking up rocks to extract any minerals left there. If they are lucky they make about $20 a week.

    "It's back breaking work that often takes place at extremely high altitudes and in adverse climactic conditions." Through a National Endowment for the Humanities grant, Kathy is back in Bolivia to learn about the lives of the women miners directly from them.

    "I plan to document their current living and working conditions by conducting personal interviews with the female and male minors and photographing them in their homes and work."