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  • Iowa State's Struck among collaborators presenting at American Astronomical Society meeting

  • A series of images from NASA's Spitzer telescope were presented at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on May 30, by a group of collaborators including Curtis Stuck, professor of physics and astronomy at Iowa State.

    The Spitzer telescope's sensitive infrared detectors map out faint regions of new star formation in this pair of colliding galaxies known as Arp 107. Young star clusters have formed along the ring-like tidal arm in this system. Spitzer images at 8 microns provide a clear view of these clumps of young stars. In contract, in the shorter wavelength 3.6 micron band, the older stars in the small companion to the northeast and the bridge connecting the two galaxies are bright.

    A journal article with a detailed analysis of the maps has been submitted to the Astronomical Journal. The research has been sponsored by NASA.

    "This is eye-catching new astronomical imagery," Struck says. "Our work is based on new data from NASA's Spitzer and GALEX space telescopes."

    Joining Struck on the research were colleagues from East Tennessee State University, Phil Appleton, former ISU astronomy professor and Vassilios Charmandaris, who is a 1995 Ph.D. graduate of Iowa State and a faculty member at Cornell University.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the Spitzer Space Telescope mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Additional images are available at

    www.etsu.edu/physics/bsmith/arp107/arp107_press.html

    www.etsu.edu/physics/bsmith/arp65/arp65_press.html